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GGC Partnership Campus, Life Science

Greenwood, SC, November 26, 2019 — The Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) Foundation, a nonprofit 501c3 established to serve as the philanthropic arm supporting the mission of the Greenwood Genetic Center, is proud to announce the launch of a new website highlighting their GGC Partnership Campus at http://partnershipcampus.com/.

The GGC Partnership Campus will serve as both an anchor of Greenwood’s emerging Medical Innovation District and as a vital, connected hub within the broader Greenwood community. The campus will become the location of choice for companies and organizations seeking a quality-of-life environment with a focus on promoting connections and collaboration.

The GGC Partnership Campus will provide a unique asset for the City of Greenwood while supporting GGC’s long-term goals for the delivery of clinical care, diagnostic testing, research advances, and educational initiatives.

In addition to the Greenwood Genetic Center, the campus currently includes The Upper Savannah Council of Governments, Carolina Health Center’s Children’s Center, and the Clemson Center for Human Genetics’ Self Regional Hall.

The Clemson Center for Human Genetics’ (CCHG) presence on the campus enables Clemson’s growing genetics program to collaborate closely with the tradition of excellence in genetic services, testing, and research at GGC, combining basic science with clinical care. Last year, CCHG named internationally acclaimed geneticist, Dr. Trudy Mackay, as Director of CCHG. Dr. Mackay is building a team of researchers to advance the understanding of the fundamental principles by which genetic and environmental factors determine and predict both healthy traits and susceptibility to disease in humans. Together, the CCHG and GGC will strive to use new technologies and knowledge to develop treatments for genetic disorders.

The GGC Partnership Campus website features a streamlined modern design, improved functionality, and easy access to essential information to help individuals and companies looking to locate on the GGC Partnership Campus. The new comprehensive website offers campus information, relocation assistance, a facilities overview, news, and contact information.

About The Greenwood Genetic Center Foundation

The GGC Foundation is a nonprofit 501c3 established to serve as the philanthropic arm supporting the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) in their work of serving families in the fight against genetic diseases, birth defects and autism. GGC has provided over 45 years of compassionate clinical care, unparalleled diagnostic lab services, globally-renowned research discoveries, and innovative educational programs. Visit ggc.org

Related Links

http://partnershipcampus.com/

https://www.ggc.org/foundation

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Clemson Center for Human Genetics

GREENWOOD, South Carolina — Research at the Clemson University Center for Human Genetics is revealing new insights into how genes impact drug use and addiction through a novel study of  susceptibility to the effects of cocaine and methamphetamine in fruit flies.

The research has been published by PLOS Genetics, titled “Genetics of Cocaine and Methamphetamine Consumption and Preference in Drosophila melanogaster.” The manuscript’s senior authors are geneticists Trudy Mackay and Robert Anholt of the Center for Human Genetics. The co-authors are Chad Highfill, Brandon Baker and Stephenie Stevens.

The study assesses naturally occurring variation in drug self-administration and change in this behavior on repeated exposure using Drosophila melanogaster, a common fruit fly.

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Greenwood Genetic Center
SEATTLE, WA – GGC co-founder and senior clinical geneticist, Roger E. Stevenson, MD, has been honored with ‘The ACMG Foundation David L. Rimoin Lifetime Achievement Award in Medical Genetics’ at the college’s annual meeting in Seattle.
 
Stevenson, a native of Neeses, SC, is a 1962 graduate of Furman University and received his MD from Bowman Gray School of Medicine at Wake Forest, where as a medical student, he set up the school’s first chromosome lab and made a groundbreaking discovery about the risk of birth defects in mothers with PKU, a rare inherited metabolic disorder. He proceeded to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he completed a pediatric residency and research fellowship. It was there he studied under some of the giants of the emerging field of medical genetics and was a contemporary of the award’s namesake, Dr. David Rimoin.

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Greenwood Genetic Center
GREENWOOD, SC – Greenwood Diagnostic Laboratories at the Greenwood Genetic Center, in collaboration with London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), announce the launch of a new diagnostic test focused on disease-specific epigenetic signatures. The test, EpiSign, which is performed on a peripheral blood sample, analyzes DNA methylation patterns of the genome to establish a diagnosis or help resolve variants of uncertain significance (VUS) found through DNA testing.
 
To date, combined efforts have identified unique methylation patterns, known as epigenetic signatures, for 19 genetic disorders including CHARGE syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, Down syndrome, Kabuki syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Williams syndrome, ATRX syndrome, autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with deafness and narcolepsy (ADCADN), BAFopathies (Coffin-Siris syndrome , Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, Chr6q25del), Claes-Jensen syndrome, Genitopatellar syndrome, Floating Harbor syndrome, ADNP-related syndrome/Hellsmoortel-VanDerAa syndrome, and Chr7q11.23dup.

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GREENVILLE, SC – The Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) is pleased to announce it has been selected as one of approximately 20 sites in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand now enrolling patients in a clinical trial for Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The study will include more than 200 male and female individuals ages three through 17. 

FXS is a genetic condition that causes intellectual disability, behavioral and learning challenges, and is also the most common known single gene cause of autism spectrum disorder. 
 
The newly-initiated study, CONNECT-FX (Clinical Study of Cannabidiol (CBD) in Children and Adolescents with Fragile X), is a 14-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of an investigational CBD gel (ZYN002) in children with full mutation FXS. CONNECT-FX is evaluating delivery of the drug through the skin as a potential treatment for some common behavioral symptoms associated with FXS.

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Greenwood Genetic Center

GREENWOOD, SC  – The Greenwood Genetic Center’s (GGC’s) new Director of Research, Richard Steet, PhD, is bringing big changes to the Center. Steet, who joined GGC in August from the University of Georgia, and his longtime collaborator, Heather Flanagan-Steet, PhD, have developed an aquaculture facility at the Center for the study of zebrafish, a model organism for human genetic disorders.

And now Steet has successfully renewed a National Institutes of Health R01 grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences which will bring $1.2 million dollars to the Center’s Division of Research over the next four years.

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Clemson Center for Human Genetics

GREENWOOD, South Carolina – Trudy Mackay and Robert Anholt of Clemson University’s Center for Human Genetics in Greenwood have received $1.87 million from the National Institutes of Health to advance research aimed at significantly increasing our fundamental understanding of the complex roles molecular variations play in human disease.

Human beings share 99.9 percent of all DNA (the carrier of genetic information), but the 0.1 percent that isn’t shared is what makes each person unique. Everyone’s genome (an organism’s complete set of DNA) contains millions of genetic variants that affect everything from lifespan to eye color.

In an irony of sorts, the invisible inner workings of Drosophila melanogaster, a fruit fly smaller than a grain of rice, appears to hold the key to unlocking huge mysteries that have puzzled geneticists for decades. About 70 percent of fly genes have human counterparts, enabling the construction of genetic networks that are comparable in makeup and scope. Mackay and Anholt use the flies to perform genome-wide association analysis, which studies genetic variants in large numbers of different individuals to see if any variant is associated with a distinguishing quality or characteristic.

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